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Thursday, December 08, 2005

Happy Feast of the Immaculate Conception!

I hope everyone's had a good day. I just wanted to pass along a few thoughts Fr. Joe shared in his homily this evening. (If you have issue with any of the facts herein, take it up with the sweet old man in the backwards collar. I trust him, and I'm too lazy to do my own checking.)

  • There have been just seventeen Chief Justices of the Supreme Court. Of those, John Roberts is the fourth Catholic.
  • Roughly twenty-five percent of Americans today are Catholic. The second largest group self-identifies as "former Catholics." The Baptists don't show up until third. (This point is particularly dear in our area. There are 16 Baptist churches in Martin, according to the TBC.)
  • The state of Maryland--Mary's Land--proves great Catholic influence, even in colonial times.
  • The declaration of war by which the US entered World War II was made on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception. The treaty ending World War II was signed on the Feast of the Assumption.
These things, especially when considered alongside the fact that the Bishops of the United States placed our country in the patronage of the Blessed Virgin under the title of the Immaculate Conception, should show us that, even though America may try to forget Our Lady, she does not forget us. Catholics have great influence in America. We should use that influence and the intercession given for us by the Mother of God to do the work of His Kingdom.

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3 Comments:

Blogger Der Tommissar said...

The state of Maryland--Mary's Land--proves great Catholic influence, even in colonial times.

The Catholics of Maryland were betrayed within a generation. That is why at Old St. Joseph's in Philadelphia the following inscription can be read:

When in 1733 St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church was founded and Dedicated to the Guardian of the Holy Family it was the only place in the entire English speaking world where public celebration of the Holy sacrifice of the Mass was permitted by law.

11:51 AM  
Blogger Paul said...

Yeah, I remember learning that (not about that particular church, but about Maryland). Lord Baltimore didn't restrict who was settling in his Catholic refuge, and it turned out to be mostly Protestants who promptly placed the same restrictions on Catholic religion and political participation as were found everywhere else.

Catholics: the only group of people it has always been politically correct to hate.

2:57 PM  
Blogger tom said...

check my site for a comment on Mary, feast days and the Immaculate Conception.
Enjoy your info.

9:14 PM  

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